Home > entrepreneur, future, motiviation > Knowing What To Do Next

Knowing What To Do Next

July 21, 2007

Found this via Robyn McMaster at brainbasedbiz , but it comes from Liz Struass at Successful Blogging. It is the easiest yet most difficult set of guidelines any of can follow. Read first, then see my explanations.

Say, "No."
… When they say, "Be Someone Other."
Say, "No."
… When they ask you to do what they won’t.
Say, "No."
… Unless your heart and your head say "This is Where My Feet Need to Go."

While these are great adages to follow and believe, sometimes life is not going to let you get away with saying "No.". Ask any six-year-old asking for a candy. Ask any parent asking a teenager to clean their room.

1. Say, "No." when they say, "Be Someone Other."

Oh, I totally agree with this one. Never let anyone stop you from being yourself. Actually it’s impossible to be anything other than yourself. The problem is that too many people don’t know who they are, where they fit, or what they are good at. I have days where I am one of those people. Don’t we all?

But most days I wake up knowing what I want to do and where each step is going to take me. Amusingly, I take a lot of tangent-steps in my effort to get somewhere – but I still get there.

The important thing is to remember who you are now – and stay that person through all the scary, sad, and happy moments. When the money rolls in, remember where you started. When your fear of the dark and unknown is overcome, take one look back to blow a raspberry at the ghosts and goblins. When happy moments happen, remember to smile back. A smile is a reward higher priced than money itself.

2. Say, "No." When they ask you to do what they won’t.

This is often difficult to enforce. For those of who have day-jobs, we’ll often come across those who will ask requests of us they…
1. Don’t want to learn,
2. Don’t feel they need to learn, and
3. Many who simply passing the buck.

If you don’t want to learn a skill, yet you need it to do your job – you are doing yourself a disservice. You are decreasing your opportunities to improve, you are not reaching your full potential – and you are costing your company a lot of money. Not because they need to train you – but they are carrying you. Other people are doing your work behind your back because you fail to do it, either properly or at all. Nobody needs employees like that.

When someone says, "Oh, I don’t need to know, you’ll do it!" or "Here, take this project, get it done, you’ve got till yesterday, but I’ll accept next week!", you may need to accept this at face value and not get aggressive. Praise and salary-raise may not be forth-coming – so just remember : Your time is worth far more than that other persons if you have put in the effort. When someone fails to show appreciation, they’ll receive none in return. Praise begets praise.

3. Say, "No." Unless your heart and your head say "This is Where My Feet Need to Go."

This is the most important of all. When a time has come to change direction, it’s important to take one step at a time. The first step is to recognise the moment has arrived. The next is to want to change. And then to change direction, walk a new path, and living a new life.

Liz writes a great article – and has stirred all these thoughts in me. I/We need to take stock of where we are at, take a moment to realise where we are, where we are going, and what’s next.

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  1. July 21, 2007 at 3:52 PM

    Hi Stephen,
    thank you! You and I agree on the entire post that you’ve written. Thank you for extending the ideas so wonderfully.
    Liz

  2. July 21, 2007 at 4:17 PM

    My pleasure Liz.
    But I freely admit that I write this for myself as much as anyone else. There are a great many things in my life I want to say NO to, but the time’s not right. Yet.

  3. July 22, 2007 at 12:29 AM

    And, Stephen, it’s also keeping your head on the person you want to be and working out an action plan to make these possibilities a reality. I find that positives move us far beyond and negatives we encounter.

    Thanks so much for giving both me and Liz a shout. You might enjoy ways that Joanna Young unpacked this same piece…
    http://coachingwizardry.typepad.com/coachingwizardry/2007/07/weaving-words-t.html

  4. July 22, 2007 at 1:02 AM

    Robyn, again, my pleasure.

    Thanks for the link to Johanna’s piece. Reading it now…

  5. July 22, 2007 at 11:42 PM

    The art of saying no…it is a necessary thing that is so hard for me. And you are right – timing is everything.

    Thanks for the link!

  6. July 23, 2007 at 12:56 PM

    Isn’t it interesting how sometimes you’ll be needing to hear/read something and it just finds you? I didn’t go out looking for this type of inspiration, yet tonight I ended up on your blog by chance and read something that focuses exactly on a problem I need to correct.

    Thank you!

  7. July 23, 2007 at 8:19 PM

    @April. I can personally testify that saying “No” is difficult. I’m married. :D

    @Lynda: Mostly I write to help myself, to vent, to reveal my thoughts in such a way that I’m sending a message to myself to change, fix, repair and become. So I am glad that the message is helping others also.

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