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Before Smart Phones

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How times change. In 2007 I purchased the Apple Touch, a smartphone with no phone but all the other functions we take for granted now.

Back them when I travelled on the train each morning I was the ONLY person staring down at my device.

It is now 2015 and EVERY person has a smartphone … and some ALSO have a laptop, tablet or gameboy.

These days, though clearly not this morning, I like to shake up the status quo: I leave my phone in my bag and stare out the window dreaming and thinking about tomorrow.

Naming Photography Collections Appropriately

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Breaking Through to the Other Side A few nights ago I was pondering if I should give my photography collections fancy names.

I wanted to use interesting words that described the nature of the collection yet without sounding all pretentious and prissy.

It still had to sound masculine, yet attracting everyone. So I did what everyone does: I googled a few words, changed the criteria a few times and finally stumbled onto these two articles:

How to Name Your Packages

Lawrence says in the first line: A vital element of packaging and promoting your products is language.”
So true.Choosing each word to specifically convey the message you really want to say is paramount. See I what I did there? Seriously, read this, your product range will go from basic to premium in no time!

Top 10 Tricks for Creating Photography Packages that Sell

Leah Remillét, a strategist for professional photographers, shares her top 10 tips we should all know about offering photography packages to our clientele. She offers better word choices, better structure to your offer, and the difference between cost and value. I love her tips on when best to start on any project.

Line Up I am sure there are more articles regarding the issue.

These two say enough for me to consider where I want to go from here. Look out for MY premium gold collection or the Caviar on Crackers collection! ;)

Learning from Mistakes during a Lunar Eclipse

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I have found a great way to quadruple the speed of my heart beat. There is a connection with the title of this article.

1. Put your moderately heavy Canon 50D + Canon 70-200mm lens on a flimsy yet surprisingly sturdy tripod.
2. Find your focal point.
3. Then tighten every thing on the tripod into position.
4. Take your hands away believing that it’s all OK. In the same 3 micro seconds that the rear end of your camera tilts backward and the lens shoot straight up, your hands reach out believing the whole tripod will go over – and your heart rate quadruples.

It didn’t fall over. Yet I  learnt something tonight about photographing the lunar eclipse:

1. A strong sturdy tripod is important. Never forget to pack it when travelling to a dark location with minimal street lights. Somehow the one thing that mattered most was left at home. Sigh.

2. A zoom lens helps. A Canon 70-200mm f4 is good, yet I highly recommend adding 1.4x or 2x connector. (Next on my purchase list!)

3. Whatever extra attachment it takes to fire your camera remotely. Most good camera’s can be shot remotely.

4. A good dSLR. I am not a brandist. Do your research.

What I learnt most this evening from my attempt to capture the blood moon is why I love photography so much:

1. The ability to capture a scene. Yes, I can see it with my eyes. Yes, everyone else has shot it. But I haven’t and I want to. So there.

2. The learning, trials, mistakes and tribulations of capturing that scene.

3. The fact that none of it is easy.

Anyone who thinks photography is boring has clearly never tried to shoot a blood moon lunar eclipse. IMHO.

Through the Tram Window

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My wife, her mother, myself and our two young lads drove to Victor Harbor yesterday. We go about once a year.

Our oldest boy, Mr-Almost-Three, enjoyed the horse and tram across to Granite Island. We took a look at trams trapped in a glass shed, and I almost got him into the Whale Centre, but the day was nearly over. So we sprinted for the tram, and managed to get on in time … to enjoy a ride across to the island and back. The ladder to the open top was climbed several times by Mr-Almost-Three, with Daddy’s heartbeat increasing upon his decent each time.

Finally returning from our all-day-trip, I took the opportunity to edit a few images to make me feel better. Nothing beats a bit of photo manipulation. Well, almost nothing. Check out more of my photo manipulation artwork here .

Tram to Granite Island

Horse and Carriage

CSS Snippets + Sites of Interest

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I wrote similar posts to this one a few years ago, but two new loves have stolen my night and online life: Children.

Our first little-man was 2.75 years ago, our most recent lad was born on March 2nd 2015. Aha,  just 3 days ago. He is still in hospital with mum as she recovers from her belly-slashing. I have only hugged him three times, helped him have his first bath, and rocked him to sleep once. He is adorable.

But I digress.

I am a HTML trawler. Yes, I scrape your HTML to learn how a thing is happening and how I can reproduce it. Rest assured, I don’t simply copy and paste. I copy and paste into an editor, test it to ensure I have all the components … then carefully research it. I want to know how and why, it has always been my passion. Heck, when I first got online in 1998, I spent about two years reading LOTS of information regarding HTML and CSS (and a few other webdev languages) as my main focus.

Which is a great segue into my favourite paragraph by Daniel Mall: It says everything about my (sporadic) reading, testing, writing, coding and creating CSS/HTML over the last 16 years. Here it is:

Construction Site I read as much as I could from people like: Mike Davidson, Shaun Inman, Jason Santa Maria, Dave Shea, Jeffrey Zeldman, Jeff Croft, Andy Budd, Eric Meyer, Ryan Sims, Jeremy Keith, Garrett Dimon, Jared Christensen, Mark Boulton, Wilson Miner, D. Keith Robinson, Faruk Ateş, Ethan Marcotte, Derek Featherstone, Greg Storey, Cameron Moll, Roger Johansson, Khoi Vinh, Dan Cederholm, Dan Rubin, and so many more.
/…/ When these people wrote a new post, I read it.
/…/ This was a community I wanted to be associated with.

Wow, me too! And the funny thing? I am rereading their blogs & articles again after a long hiatus. It feels like finding old friends. None of them would know me, but I feel like I know them. Many of the site designs have changed (that’s how well I feel I know these people, I remember some their sites from 10 years ago!), yet their writing style is much the same, though evolved. The webdev bug is strong in me and ready to resume learning.

So now let me show you what CSS/HTML I have found via my #scrape&learn process. I won’t explain each, I simply show them. If you have an interest in this field, you will see the value in them:

Restoration of Rotunda on River Torrens


/* Sits at base of page, beneath all text. Could be used as a fixed base */
.base { background-color: #666; color: red; text-align: center; padding: 0.5em 0; position: absolute; bottom: 0; left; 0; width: 100%; }
.base a { color: green; text-decoration: none; }
.base a:hover, .back a:focus { color: yellow; }

// Found here


Version #1

<meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width,initial-scale=1″ />
/* Fix for device screen width */
@viewport {
zoom: 1.0;
width: extend-to-zoom;
@-ms-viewport {
width: extend-to-zoom;
zoom: 1.0;

Version #2

<meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1, minimum-scale=1, maximum-scale=1, user-scalable=no” />


<p class=”jitter” style=”left: -4px; -webkit-transform: rotate(-1deg);”>

Example here

Cliched View of Adelaide Iconic Horizon That’s enough samples for you. Three each time is enough.

Okay, next I show you interesting #webdev sites. I am always finding and reading tidbits of information about stuff I think can make my own site look better, or else which I can incorporate into #holdingbay pages. Yet since fails for me regularly, I will post as articles with my descriptions. Plus it keeps my browser bookmarks tidier! Here goes…

1. Textile live web editor ~ A WYSIWYG editor where the code is on the left an the output is on the right. Includes the final HTML output for easy insertion into the page of choice. I use it for creating blog posts. Textile is so much easier for attaching URLs.

2. Fillerati ~ Lorem Ipsum is often confusing for clients. I had a client a few years back who asked if the content had been hacked on a #dummysite I was showing them. Sigh. This may still confuse them, but at least my english-speaking clients will at least go “Ooooh!”

3. A Pixel Identity Crisis by SCOTT KELLUM January 17, 2012 ~ Basically, pixel definition changes the defined appearance of a site on a smartphone. A long read, but our design process will improve for it.

4. Stephen Coles ~ Visit his ‘bits of work’ pages. Mostly visit to see how he uses his website. Inspirational. # |

5. Carolyn Wood ~ Another great web site design. Simple colours, easy to follow, uncluttered and to the point.

6. HappyCogI have visited their site many times over the years. The home page has changed dramatically since last I looked. Thankfully their articles are still cognitive. ;)

7. Quantity Queries for CSS by HEYDON PICKERING March 03, 2015 ~ Wow. Heavy reading, yet very interesting. May have to read that again. I can see already it will be worth it to incorporate into my site, thereby making it easy to access from a tablet or smartphone. Can see potential for expansion.

8. How to Build an App ( ~ The thing most fascinating is the slightly tilted paragraphs. The answer is in the HTML. I have included in my sample CSS above. PLUS the article is interesting and educational.

9. What is your ViewPort size? ~ With so many smartphones and devices on the market, how can you be sure of the dimensions of any of them? Yes, this site can tell you. Email to yourself, open in browser on your device. Voila!

Nine is enough. I will try to write these style of posts once a week. Heck, with WordPress I can schedule them – and I still have hundreds of interesting articles and sites waiting to be re-revealed. Watch out for them…

Oakbank Race Course

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Whilst going through all my Flickr photographs for a handful to add to a new album, I found these few photographs shot during my younger brother’s 40th birthday. Figured they needed a little air-time. All shot on a Canon 400D.

210-degree Pano of Oakbank RaceCourse
Stitched Panorama of about 7 photographs
210degree Pano of Oakbank RaceCourse

Waiting to be Served
I swear, it felt like ghosts were in the room whilst I photographed these scenes.
Waiting to be Served

Racing Carpet
Inside the Oakbank Racecourse
Racing Carpet

Old aerial view of oakbank
Found in a back room, inside the Oakbank Racecourse
old aerial view of oakbank

Oakbank Race Course – Horse Head
Walking around the grandstands looking for a good shot, I found these horseheads. Great detail!
Oakbank Race Course - Horse Head

Oakbank Race Course – Stadium
Oakbank Race Course - Stadium

Oakbank Race Course – Shillabeer Stand
Oakbank Race Course - Shillabeer Stand

Then the party started – and I became the barman for a few hours.

Birth #2

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A child was born yesterday. Our second. I wasn’t able to be in surgery for the birth of our first child, so I took the opportunity this time to capture images of everything permitted in the surgical-theatre.

Here are the few photos I am permitted to show of the experience.

Hands are wonderous, even covered in latex. These are the anesthetist nurse’s, holding my wife’s hands. I found the creases in the surgical gloves a detail worth capturing.

Another glove shot, this time with a needle. The nurse informed me their was a bubble in the drip, this was the easiest way to manage it.

I aimed my camera over my shoulder and pulled the trigger … capturing the surgeons tools, waiting for use. They are not nearly as macabre as movies make them out to be.

I am sure it all did something important, I just have no idea what.
Fully Equiped

Upon removal from mother, babies are placed here for all their tests and jabs. The bed is small yet warm and ample space for several nurses to work.

My Canon EOS M will fire randomly in a language-filled room. This was one of the shots captured as I held my camera in my lap.

Clogs at the angle. This was one of a few shots randomly taken by my Canon EOS M whilst I held it at my side.

Each arm of mother is supported by these simple clamp systems attached to the gurney. All I could think was “Oh, that would make a great monopod joint!”
Ball Joint

CLOGS in monchrome

That is all. My wife and I choose not to show photos of our children in an open-internet environment, so this is all you will see. Family excepted.