GO BEYOND YOUR LIMITS! (10 Years on Youtube)

Of all the YouTube channels I subscribe to, there is only one that I return to over and over again – Casey Neistat.

A recent vlog is now watched repeatedly. This one is a gentle yet constant reminder what I want to achieve on my own channel. I have watched it 5 times. It blows my mind. Which is it? Wait, it will be the last video I show in this list.

I have had a Youtube channel since 2007 – again, another 10 years with one channel – yet it’s not the longest! I digress. Back on track…

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL HISTORY

For the longest time I did almost nothing on YouTube. I remember saying to someone in 2008“It’s just a fad, it won’t last.” Oh dear, how wrong was I! Mostly I liked and categorized videos, probably like a lot of people did. I had a U2 collection, plus some series of cartoons that intrigued me. But YouTube kept changing the privacy on stuff, and then deleted channels that somehow violated their terms – yet nobody could see why.

In early 2012, whilst working on a Government ITC Help Desk, I worked with a young guy who said “Instead of playing PS/Xbox/Wii games, I just watch their YouTube channels – it’s cheaper!” Within a month I was hooked on a few youtube gamer channels whose style was consistent, crazy-funny, and catching worldwide attention. You may know who I mean.

Late 2015, thanks to a friend on Facebook, I was advised to check out Casey Neistat Apple batteries vlog . Then he started vlogging daily. Vlogging became a word.

Early 2016 I revamped my YouTube channel, removing all the Liked videos and vlogs, and uploaded a dozen videos shot by my wife – using them to show off her honey business on Kangaroo Island, planning to use them on our GoFundMe page. The funding didn’t pan out as imagined, so that also needs a revamp! Yet I still love the bee vlogs I created…

Then I started vlogging our weekly visits to Cleland Wildlife Park … so all our Australian-Zoo visits also got uploaded!

In mid 2016, after a very long hiatus being the Dead Reds Wine Group photographer, I decided to vlog the night’s drinking – and everyone who went appreciated it. Actually, vlogging made it all the more fun – people spoke to their camera!

I found finances to buy a very decent movie editor program: Movavi. Windows Movie Maker was insufficient! Movavi has been great for creating eclectic music to go over wind-filled footage, converting and compressing, then uploading to YouTube without any problems.

Then in July 2016, I twisted my right knee so much that my vlogging took a backseat until I recovered sufficiently to get around without pain. I still shot a lot, but I was getting so tired from the exercise needed that tonnes of footage sits incomplete.

In early 2017 we moved to Kangaroo Island. Within a month I uploaded a short vlog that received 200 views in a few days – which blew my mind and reminded me of my journey. I was back on track!

Then Casey added his “DO WHAT YOU CAN’T” vlog. Wow. It was like a smack in the face for me.

It brings me back to his channel once a week to remind myself of what I am aiming to achieve.
Yet I say it is probably not the best mantra.

I prefer to say “GO BEYOND YOUR LIMITS”.

It’s true, a lot of people set limits on their goals, consequently limiting their potential. Ashamed to say I have done the same, and possibly still do on some issues.

Some people have budgetary constraints, some have fear of success or failure limits, and many put limits on themselves because they don’t believe in their ability – even though they have never had a go!

Whenever I think I have limits, I imagine living in a 3rd-world country where there is no money, life is all hand-outs from foreign aid, and living is day-to-day. You and I have a far better life than that: We have a roof over our head, a bed each night, and we know where your next meal is coming from – and it’s three times a day!

So what is your limit? Probably next to nothing by comparison!
I am not going to lie: When I had money, I bought things that I knew I would utilise and would last a long time. Good camera gear, particularly the accessories. What I didn’t forsee is how I would use them.

The planets have recently realigned for me.
Expect more vlogs over the next few months.
What will they be about now? Well, I have to thank my Radio show for revitalizing my self-confidence, particularly my speaking and writing skills. So I have a few ideas in mind. Now to create them with almost no budget!

Let’s see what I do next (week)….

Looking Back: 10 Years of Blogging on WordPress

Sometimes it’s good to look back in time to where we began blogging. I started blogging way back in the early 00’s (that’s 2000, not 1900!), first on Geocities, then I moved over to Blogger, and now I have been on WordPress since 2006!

Here are a few of mine articles from way back then:

Hope that intrigued you. It’s always good for me: I enjoy reminiscing on times before I attained Vertigo back in 2012. I somehow lost both good and bad life-memories because of it. Thinkin’ I should do this more often, for each year online.

[UPDATE] Whilst editing my archives on Sunday afternoon I discovered I have written similar articles over the last 15 months. This one – Ten Years on WordPress – is a little more comprehensive.
Oops. Yet I will let both articles remain independent. At least now I can easily search and find the articles (because I have added more #tags), therefore won’t do it again until my fifteenth and twentieth year of blogging!
[/UPDATE]

Postscript: The following two photos were photographed on Kangaroo Island back in 2005(ish), shot with a Canon 400D and a stock lens.
The first is from the top of Prospect Hill. It has been closed for the last few years due to weathering of the steps up the dunes.
The second is on the Penneshaw grass just up from the SeaLink jetty.
If you have been to KI, you will know the places.

Vanishing Point

Heli-Landing

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The Sound of Silence

This is the original version of ‘The Sound of Silence‘ from 1964 from the album ‘Wednesday Morning, 3 AM’: Just Simon’s guitar and the vocals.

After ‘Wednesday Morning, 3 AM‘ flopped, they split up.

Without either of their knowledge, both electric guitars and drums were added and this version of The Sound of Silence became very popular, reaching #1 on the charts in America on New Years Day, 1966.

Because of this, Simon and Garfunkel teamed up again and created three more studio albums, one of which one a Grammy award for album of the year and song of the year (Bridge Over Troubled Water).

Information garnered from YouTube comments, relevant links added. Why? Because I love this song, I will be including in my radio-show one Friday soon on 5KIxFM Kangaroo Island Community Radio. Listen out for it.

The Basic Updates to HTML over the last 15 Years

First let me say that I STILL design my sites using CSS elements and HTML tags and attributes to give my websites improved function and form. I won’t deny that sometimes they are not pretty – but I design to suit my needs now, not for anyone else.

Whilst many other designers are now using purchased templates, I enjoy writing the background code. I enjoy that little yippee-moment when the CSS works.

I remember the first time I built a sprite based header navigation in blogger.com way back in 2004! Because blogger enabled users to modify the HTML and CSS, I spent many an evening tinkering, learning, applying, reapplying, until I had a site I liked. It was also at that time that I started creating graphics for sprites.

This morning I wanted to write an explanation of what I have enjoyed over the last 15 years of coding CSS, yet felt I couldn’t easily put it into words. Thankfully I found Casadaro Shearrod’s simplified yet succinct list displaying the basic differences/upgrades of HTML over the last 20 years.

HTML 1 – linked documents
HTML 2 – linked documents with stylized text and tables.
HTML 3 – more of 1 and 2 with some Browser specific features.
HTML 4 – a re-evaluation of 3 to removes some clutter that arrived in 2 and 3.
HTML 5 – pretty much the same as 1 with the ability to specify document structures and multimedia element.

His last line below is the #1  reason I stopped designing for others. 

Knowing HTML5 in practice means we know HTML and CSS. We can do what used to be done with HTML 1,2, and 3, but we can do those things more effectively, with greater efficiency, and on a larger scale. This is what gave birth to the Web application and server side programing and scripting but, that’s a whole different talk.

HTML and CSS are not difficult to learn, but it is time consuming to both unlearn and learn as updates occur. I chose to stop. I achieved what I set out to do, so was able to tick it off my bucket list of achievements, then move onto new ventures.

And that is where I choose to end this article. Does this mean I no longer code? Are you kidding?! Reading some of the URL‘s linked above gets me fired up and interested again … so I am already pondering my website revamp!

Tool Board

Quotes from What are the differences among HTML2.x HTML3.x and HTML4.x?, written 7.Nov.2014 by Casadaro Shearrod.

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25 Years of Musician Photography

Check out my photographs of Australian musicians at the 1992 Adelaide Grand Prix.

These were photographed at my first concert, shooting with my first SLR, in 1992.

I purchased a body (brand forgotten), telephoto lens, and a 40 rolls of 36 film somewhere in Adelaide – I think I had to hock something to pay for it all. Then I shot the lot in one day, despite the costs!

In the late 1990‘s I scanned the negatives and saved to 3.5inch floppy discs.

In the early 2000‘s, I dug up those discs and converted all that I could to CD.

In 2008 I found those CD’s, and in 2010 I found them again in my archives – and put them onto my flickr gallery

Finally, the negatives were found in early 2017 during a shed-cleanup.

Sometime this year I will have them rescanned, manipulated, saved, and archived again…

Jimmy and Johnny Rocking Hard, Adelaide GrandPrix Concert

Between Prayer, Luck & Fate

I don’t mind anymore when people say, after I tell them I have a job interview, “Good Luck, I’ve got my fingers crossed” or “We are praying for your success!”

I don’t take them too literally. Anymore.

Yet part of me wishes luck or prayer could be the deciding factor. 

But when they say “Ah well, maybe next time, try again” or “Maybe it wasn’t meant to be”, I feel like screaming. 

It’s soul destroying enough to lose to an interview that failed its own process  (topic for another conversation) – but their flippant words suggests that somehow luck and predetermination sit side by side. 

Since prayer is the belief that a higher being is controlling the universe, how can any religious person not cringe at themselves when they wish me luck?