Looking Back: 10 Years of Blogging on WordPress

Sometimes it’s good to look back in time to where we began blogging. I started blogging way back in the early 00’s (that’s 2000, not 1900!), first on Geocities, then I moved over to Blogger, and now I have been on WordPress since 2006!

Here are a few of mine articles from way back then:

Hope that intrigued you. It’s always good for me: I enjoy reminiscing on times before I attained Vertigo back in 2012. I somehow lost both good and bad life-memories because of it. Thinkin’ I should do this more often, for each year online.

[UPDATE] Whilst editing my archives on Sunday afternoon I discovered I have written similar articles over the last 15 months. This one – Ten Years on WordPress – is a little more comprehensive.
Oops. Yet I will let both articles remain independent. At least now I can easily search and find the articles (because I have added more #tags), therefore won’t do it again until my fifteenth and twentieth year of blogging!
[/UPDATE]

Postscript: The following two photos were photographed on Kangaroo Island back in 2005(ish), shot with a Canon 400D and a stock lens.
The first is from the top of Prospect Hill. It has been closed for the last few years due to weathering of the steps up the dunes.
The second is on the Penneshaw grass just up from the SeaLink jetty.
If you have been to KI, you will know the places.

Vanishing Point

Heli-Landing

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Between Prayer, Luck & Fate

I don’t mind anymore when people say, after I tell them I have a job interview, “Good Luck, I’ve got my fingers crossed” or “We are praying for your success!”

I don’t take them too literally. Anymore.

Yet part of me wishes luck or prayer could be the deciding factor. 

But when they say “Ah well, maybe next time, try again” or “Maybe it wasn’t meant to be”, I feel like screaming. 

It’s soul destroying enough to lose to an interview that failed its own process  (topic for another conversation) – but their flippant words suggests that somehow luck and predetermination sit side by side. 

Since prayer is the belief that a higher being is controlling the universe, how can any religious person not cringe at themselves when they wish me luck?

Ensure your House Smoke Detectors Meet Current Regulations (AUS)

Power Up! I researched this information after our rental-home smoke-detector beeping beeped at 2.30am yesterday morning. At the time I also asked on Facebook (in a KI Q&A group) what should be done in the short term: All my good friends on Kangaroo Island suggested the 9Volt battery needed replacing. Yes, there is one inside the device.

Here’s where the issue lies:

  1. We believe the noise was the actual smoke detector noise, not the battery-dying noise.
    That was worrying, which is why I went straight to FB to ask in the forums. I imagined someone else might have experienced this and knew exactly what to do. Many great responses were provided, and I learnt a lot. There’s no saying if we were wrong or right in our decision, but I feel we did the right thing.
  2. We only moved into the house 3 weeks ago. Which got me thinking.
    Should it be responsibility of the tenant leaving OR the new tenant to replace the battery? Maybe the previous tenant should be required to indicate on the ‘final paperwork’ when they replaced the smoke-detector battery?

Short Back and Sides Mid afternoon, after all electrical problems in our house were fixed, I found these three websites – and was amazed by the information so much that I felt it prudent that all SA home owners, landlords, and renters should read and know. As I suspected we all have obligations and rights, all of which are designed to save lives:

1. CFS \ Fire Safety \ Smoke Alarms

Home owners are required, by Regulation 76B under the Development Act, 1993, to install battery powered or hard-wired (240 volt mains powered) smoke alarms.

  • Houses built since 1 January 1995 must be equipped with hard-wired smoke alarms.
  • All other houses must be equipped with at least 9 volt battery powered smoke alarms.
    [MY TWO CENTS] If you like to keep the house, or getting the rent on it, put in the hard-wired option! [/END]
  • When a house with 9 volt battery powered smoke alarms is sold the new owner has six months to install alarms which are hard-wired to the 240 volt power supply or powered by 10 year life, non-replaceable, non-removable batteries.

Heat Generator Penalties apply for non-compliance.

2. Our State Government provide a simplistic website layout for anyone, either on a computer or smartphone, to obtain the regulatory information easily and quickly provide/explain to your landlord to prove your case.

3. The Real Estate Institute of South Australia also provide quick explanations and simple tips and traps to ensure the correct information is available.

Our issue (and a few others) was resolved within 12 hours. I hope your household wiring, smoke detectors, house alarm, and any other electrical items are repaired or replaced in a timely manner to ensure your house/contents/family are not at risk!

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Giving Away Is The Biggest Reward

​In an effort to clean up my office and clean out my life, and because I believed at the time we were moving to Kangaroo Island sooner, I had a MASSIVE clean up of books in my mancave/office.

One year ago today (16th February 2016) I piled all these books because I felt I would never read them again:

But our local book-swap store didn’t accept these computer and webdesign books. Apparently they have a ‘low turnover rate’. I thought they need to ‘target market‘ their books.

When I looked through their store, I got out fast: They made hoarders look like kittens amongst lions.

So I tried to sell/swap to people who would appreciate them. I put the photo above in my Facebook and said “Take a look and see if you know someone who would like them…” – believing I could sell them.

One response got my full attention.

There is a guy down at the Little Rundle Sttreet Art Project who has a double-decker bus he is taking around Australia to teach digital literacy to rural towns. He needs donations of books! … He is James Arthur Warren and he is a TESOL teacher by training.

www.gofundme.com/j6hahs

James, wherever you are today, I hope you are either able to use my massive donation of books to teach new skills to people,who otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity – or you were able to give/sell them to new owners. No, don’t tell me where they are.

Of all the things I regret giving away to save space for our big to Kangaroo Island, my books I miss the most. Yet I felt better for giving them to someone who would use them to teach others made me feel good inside.

It wasn’t giving up, but passing both them and myself  to a new home and life.

What are you giving away today?

POEM: Dear Sun

Dear Sun,

I watched you raise your weary head
From the hills of Adelaide that were last night’s bed.

You rose up quickly, faster than expected,
Before 6.30am it was like you’d not even rested.

My camera caught your beauty,
your radiant explosion of orange,
You drew breath as you appeared as if a bride arriving for her marriage.

Mornings dew melted on grass around me, Flowers opened to grasp the first ray,
And garbage trucks rumbled along Kingscote Jetty,
a reminder that it is Wednesday.

Poem about these photos of this morning’s sun [08.Feb.2017] rising over the mainland as I sat at Kingscote Jetty:

Kingscote Jetty

Kingscote Jetty (First Sun)

IMG_8789

Kingscote Jetty

Decluttering is Liberating

Whilst discussing the issue of cleaning and clearing our home to the point that I feel comfortable to transport all that remains to our new home on Kangaroo Island, I found was defining my true self.

Lisa said “Enjoy the process [of decluttering] and be kind to yourself – watch the minimalists.” At first I thought she was calling a group of people ‘Minimalists’. But the ‘the’ made me think there was a movie. There is… The Minimalists !

Here’s are my quotes:


If you ever get a chance – empty your house of everything you own, remove all the clutter, then see what is left. It’s incredibly liberating.


We all seem to collect dust collectors, stationery, trinkets, copious amounts of clothing, pillows and towels.


Thankfully I am not a materialist. Better yet I refuse to have a credit card. Everything I own is because I wanted it AND because I can afford it outright. Some of my camera gear has taken me YEARS to buy.


Wow. Whilst responding to a statement, I defined myself. Ultimately I am a minimalist. But only in my own mind. Unfortunately my house is rarely representative on my mind.

My next post will explain how my this post and the one previous don’t conflict. Because I can see how you think they might.

Radical Change Won’t Happen Overnight 

​This mesaage is circulating the internet, particularly Facebook. First read it through, then answer this:

  • Is it at all feasible?
  • Do you really think anyone in Parliament house is going to say “Oh that makes sense, let’s make radical changes overnight!”

Proposals to make politicians shoulder their share of the weight now that the Age of Entitlement is over:
1. Scrap political pensions.

Politicians can purchase their own retirement plan, just as most other working Australians are expected to do.
2. Retired politicians (past, present & future) participate in Centrelink. A Politician collects a substantial salary while in office but should receive no salary when they’re out of office.

Terminated politicians under 70 can go get a job or apply for Centrelink unemployment benefits like ordinary Australians.

Terminated politicians under 70 can negotiate with Centrelink like the rest of the Australian people.
3. Funds already allocated to the Politicians’ retirement fund be returned immediately to Consolidated Revenue.

This money is to be used to pay down debt they created which they expect us and our grandchildren to repay for them.
4. Politicians will no longer vote themselves a pay raise. Politicians pay will rise by the lower of, either the CPI or 3%.
5. Politicians lose their privileged health care system and participate in the same health care system as ordinary Australian people.

i.e. Politicians either pay for private cover from their own funds or accept ordinary Medicare.
6. Politicians must equally abide by all laws they impose on the Australian people.
7. All contracts with past and present Politicians men/women are void effective 31/12/16.
The Australian people did not agree to provide perks to Politicians, that burden was thrust upon them. Politicians devised all these contracts to benefit themselves.
Serving in Parliament is an honour not a career.

The Founding Fathers envisioned citizen legislators, so our politicians should serve their term(s), then go home and back to work.

Seriously, Don’t ‘copy paste & post’ this just because you like it, do it if you think it is achievable.