Learn Something New Every Day

Whilst my 2yo son cried for no apparent reason this morning, I quietly said to him … “You have been alive for less than 750 days. That’s 1/50th, a mere 2%, of your potential life. Today is just one day. Tomorrow is another. Let’s put this nappy on, and take another breath.”

It’s easy to forget that every day is a gift.

So often we tell ourselves It’s OK, I will fix/become/change/join/upgrade/update/learn/do it tomorrow – and tomorrow remains tomorrow, the day after the last day, the eighth day we dream of but never see. We keeping putting stuff off, thinking we are safe, that one day that day will come.

And this is despite, thanks to the proximity of everyone on the internet, we see every day that life is NOT forever. We hear and see violence in the middle east, terrorists in stadiums, unfortunate fatal gunshots by children. Despite this knowledge, we think our distance from these activities makes us safe from harm.

So now you know that you have approximately 36,500 days of life: What are you doing with your time?

I say this to myself daily. I have to. I am a Daddy. My two young sons are the horizon that reminds me that it’s worth the journey, and I am their rock to climb, to aspire to, to learn from, to become men themselves.

My 2yo son clearly didn’t understand much of the words I said. Yet he heard the the sombre tone in Daddy’s reassuring voice, and slowly calmed down. After a dry nappy was attached, warm clothes adorned, and tears wiped away … we hugged me and said in his beautiful little voice “Thank you Daddy” … and he waddled off to play with toys. I smiled, yet I knew he was mimicking either myself, Mummy, or even his older brother. It’s the best way to teach them – by example.

Ensure your House Smoke Detectors Meet Current Regulations (AUS)

Power Up! I researched this information after our rental-home smoke-detector beeping beeped at 2.30am yesterday morning. At the time I also asked on Facebook (in a KI Q&A group) what should be done in the short term: All my good friends on Kangaroo Island suggested the 9Volt battery needed replacing. Yes, there is one inside the device.

Here’s where the issue lies:

  1. We believe the noise was the actual smoke detector noise, not the battery-dying noise.
    That was worrying, which is why I went straight to FB to ask in the forums. I imagined someone else might have experienced this and knew exactly what to do. Many great responses were provided, and I learnt a lot. There’s no saying if we were wrong or right in our decision, but I feel we did the right thing.
  2. We only moved into the house 3 weeks ago. Which got me thinking.
    Should it be responsibility of the tenant leaving OR the new tenant to replace the battery? Maybe the previous tenant should be required to indicate on the ‘final paperwork’ when they replaced the smoke-detector battery?

Short Back and Sides Mid afternoon, after all electrical problems in our house were fixed, I found these three websites – and was amazed by the information so much that I felt it prudent that all SA home owners, landlords, and renters should read and know. As I suspected we all have obligations and rights, all of which are designed to save lives:

1. CFS \ Fire Safety \ Smoke Alarms

Home owners are required, by Regulation 76B under the Development Act, 1993, to install battery powered or hard-wired (240 volt mains powered) smoke alarms.

  • Houses built since 1 January 1995 must be equipped with hard-wired smoke alarms.
  • All other houses must be equipped with at least 9 volt battery powered smoke alarms.
    [MY TWO CENTS] If you like to keep the house, or getting the rent on it, put in the hard-wired option! [/END]
  • When a house with 9 volt battery powered smoke alarms is sold the new owner has six months to install alarms which are hard-wired to the 240 volt power supply or powered by 10 year life, non-replaceable, non-removable batteries.

Heat Generator Penalties apply for non-compliance.

2. Our State Government provide a simplistic website layout for anyone, either on a computer or smartphone, to obtain the regulatory information easily and quickly provide/explain to your landlord to prove your case.

3. The Real Estate Institute of South Australia also provide quick explanations and simple tips and traps to ensure the correct information is available.

Our issue (and a few others) was resolved within 12 hours. I hope your household wiring, smoke detectors, house alarm, and any other electrical items are repaired or replaced in a timely manner to ensure your house/contents/family are not at risk!

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Never Moving House Again!

​If you ever choose to move house, I highly recommend you do this: Don’t

If you choose to ignore me, then I recommend you follow these steps THREE months prior to removalists arrival:

1. Empty ENTIRE house into front yard.

2. Emtpy every cupboard, drawer, cabinet, shoe box, and that plastic container shoved down the back of the bed.

3. Only take back inside that which you have used in last 6 months, or has sentimental value. No, REAL sentimental value. No Troll dolls or Tupperware. 

4. Have a $1-$5 garage sale for everything in the front yard. GET RID OF IT.

5. Now ask yourself how many people live in the house, and how many of your closest friends are ever invited to your house for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Yep, not enough to warrant having an EIGHT piece set of dishes, cups, bowls, small and big dishes. GET RID OF THE EXCESS.

I wish we’d done this. I fear one of these boxes is filled with stuff going straight to landfill upon opening.

Capturing the Most Ferocious Animals in Australia 

For the last four years, pretty much since my first son was born, we’ve visited Cleland Wildlife Park every Saturday morning.

Whilst it’s been for the benefit our boys to (1) tire them out for a good night’s sleep that night so my wife and I can have a  peaceful evening, plus (2) to show them Australian wildlife up front and personal. Oh, there’s fences for the Tasmanian Devil, the Dingos, and the DropBears (Koalas), but the Ducks, Potoroos, Wallabies and Kangaroos can be patted easily. Just beware the Emu! 

I’ve taken my camera along nearly every time to catch the more ferocious animals in action or asleep.

Unfortunately tomorrow will be our last visit for quite some time. (My regular flat-white coffee will be gotten at Chocol’Art in Kingscote from hereon.)

At least I will have these memories to show our kids how much fun we had together… 

… and that we go again later this year! If not, we will be going to the many National Parks on Kangaroo Island as time permits. Watch out for more videos of me and my boys with wild animals around Australia!

We Have Moved to Kangaroo Island

This time last year we made a BIG decision: To move our family to Kangaroo Island.

Explaining the benefits to each of our families actually didn’t take a lot, but there are a few who have not yet been there.

Yesterday morning I videoed some of my morning walk. Because of the tranquillity of Kingscote, it required very little editing before upload!

The resulting vlog shows one of the BEST reasons for our family relocation:

My morning walks will now be regular, particularly since I don’t have a 24/7 gym available. I had hoped for daily vlogs, but, well, kids.